Simple To Do List

I use electronic to-do lists like Google Keep, but I also use simple paper ones, and these tend to work out better for day-to-day lists.

I have pads all over the place, and also use scraps from the mail, trash, and pulled out of my notebooks.

At the end of day, or start of day, I combine them. I stick them together with tape and glue.

By putting things on paper, I don’t need to hold onto them in my mind.

They’re easier to rearrange and reschedule.

Tool Lists

Make lists of tools needed to complete a task. This way, you don’t waste time pausing work, or end up buying extra tools.

Paperwork Lists

If I’m going to need some paperwork, or an ID, or a specific card, I sometimes need to write that down as well, just so I don’t forget.

Shopping Lists

These end up on scraps of paper, as well, but eventually end up in a master list that goes on the phone. I check these when I go shopping.

Calendar

I use Google Calendar, because it has alarms.

Time critical work gets on the calendar.

I generally try not to do more than three real work tasks per day.

Getting Rid of CRT TVs

Getting rid of these TVs is pretty hard, but it can be done.

The typical way is to put it on the curb, but that’s not likely to work anymore. I see TVs trashed and damaged, and guess who gets to clean up the broken glass?

The trick is to know the markets. There are very, very few:

  • Video gamers who want a small tv to play old games.
  • Photo and film productions that need an old TV to indicate “1990s”.
  • CRT TV enthusiasts, may want a large one.
  • People who want a free TV and will take anything.

The main advantage of giving it away or selling it, rather than placing it out, is that someone else will come by to help move the TV.

Here’s a TV that ended up being used for a photo shoot. I hope they resold it. It’s a nice TV.

Porch Pick Up: Razor Scooter

I sold this on Craigslist with this ad:

Small scooter. The platform is not much larger than my size 9.5 shoe.

Model A


My goal with the text was to establish the scale. Looking at the photo, you can’t tell if this is a kiddie scooter or a bigger scooter, or an adult-sized scooter.

I set the price at $4, which is what I paid for it. I figured that others were selling at $10, and a new one is $30, so those $10 scooters aren’t a good deal, at all. $4 is a good deal.

A buyer contacted me shortly, maybe a week in, and I told him the address, and instructions to just leave the money in the mailbox.

It was left exactly where it was photographed. It’s a little hidden from the street.

That’s how you can do a Porch Pickup.


You might be thinking: why not list it for free, and get rid of it faster?

I find that freebies attract too many people, sometimes. They cause too much email communications and too many flakes.

If you set a small price, you will get rid of the people looking for free things. It doesn’t really make sense, because it costs money to go somewhere to get a free item, but it works.

I had exactly one buyer, and they didn’t flake out, at all.